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Nexus 10 reviews roundup - 'iPad killer' lacks the apps

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As Apple releases a smaller version of the iPad, called the iPad Mini, Google goes the opposite direction and introduces a larger version of its Nexus 7 tablet.

Announced last month, the Samsung-made Nexus 10 has a 10.1-inch Super PLS display, compared to the 7-inch Nexus 7 that was released in July.

The premium tablet has a screen resolution of 2560×1600, making it the world's highest resolution tablet, with a display at 300 pixels per inch. This beats the third/fourth generation iPad's 9.7 inch Retina display, which has a 2,048×1,536 resolution and 264ppi.

Google Nexus 10

© Google



The Nexus 10 also comes with a 5-megapixel rear camera capable of shooting video at 1080p resolution, along with a 1.9-megapixel front snapper for video calling.

Alongside the Nexus 4, the Nexus 10 runs the very latest Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, introducing new features such as multiple user accounts, an updated version of Google Now and 360° panoramic photo stitching called "Photo Sphere".

All this will be available for the budget price of £319 for the 16GB version, or £389 for the 32GB model. Both are WiFi-only, and both will be available on November 13.

So here is our roundup of some of the latest reviews for Google's iPad killer:

Google Nexus 10

© Google

TechRadar gives the Nexus 10 4.5 out of 5 stars, praising its strong technical specs and the fact that it is around £80 cheaper than the equivalent model new iPad. The reviewer also notes that the dual-core 1.7GHz Samsung Exynos processor and 2GB of RAM should mean the Nexus 7 has "no problem keeping pace with the fastest Android devices".

However, they criticise the look of the Nexus 10 and say that the "biggest problem" is the lack of storage, as there is no microSD and the range only goes up to 32GB. Another issue is the lack of 3G/4G.

"We fully expect a 3G (and probably 4G) version will be made available at some point - maybe even quite soon, but we can only work with what we've got and right now we've got a tablet that can't connect to the internet in a substantial amount of places," they add.

Google Android statue
The Guardian is more positive and awards the Nexus 10 the full five stars. The reviewer praises the "sleek, smooth tablet", and notes that it has more rounded corners than the iPad.

They say that the display is "uber-sharp and bright", with a 16:9 aspect ratio that is "made for movies". But the reviewer also flags up that running the Nexus 10 and iPad side by side, most users would be "hard-pressed to spot the difference" in screen quality.

Whilst the review concludes that the Nexus 10 is a "viable alternative" to the fourth generation iPad, it notes that the better "quantity and quality" of tablet apps in the Apple ecosystem "will still tip the balance for a lot of tablet buyers".

Google Nexus 10

© Google

Wired awards the Nexus 10 an eight of 10, with the reviewer saying that it "provides the most pleasant experience I've ever seen on a big-screen Android tablet".

Again, though, they note the Achilles Heel for Android tablets is the lack of apps built for the bigger screen. Wired says that even though the iPad has technically inferior specs, it is "apps that make the tablet".

"Apple's iPad, which on paper is outmatched by the Nexus 10 in nearly every way, is still a more compelling product because it has 275,000 iPad-specific apps sitting in Apple's App Store just waiting to be downloaded, touched, tapped and swiped," the review says.

iPad fourth generation

© Apple

SlashGear joins the other sites in praising the Nexus 10's display, noting that colours are "vivid"; brightness is "consistent across the display"; and viewing angles are "broad".

Performance-wise, the site notes the Nexus 10's processor lags behind some smartphones, including the Galaxy Note 2 and HTC One X+, in benchmark tests. But it adds that in general use it holds up well across HD video playback, web browsing and gaming, while battery life is impressive.

Overall, the reviewer is broadly positive on the technical performance of the Nexus 10, but agrees with the Guardian and Wired that the dearth of apps in the Android ecosystem puts it behind Apple's iPad. It does say, however, that the aggressive pricing of the slate by Google will hopefully create a big enough market to encourage more developers to take the plunge.

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