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TV Interview

Sharon Horgan ('Pulling')

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Sharon Horgan ('Pulling')
After winning a BBC New Comedy award with writing partner Dennis Kelly in 2001, Sharon Horgan has quickly carved a name for herself on the UK comedy scene. Following appearances on The Friday Night Project and Annually Retentive, Horgan, along with co-writer Kelly, created her own sitcom. Hilarious, biting and risqué, Pulling returns for its second series on Sunday. Digital Spy caught up with Horgan to discuss the BAFTA-nominated show.

What can we expect from Donna and the girls this series?
"The situations are pretty much the same as they were in the first series. They're all still living together in the house, still trying to get by. An ex-boyfriend comes back into Karen's life and that's quite a big change in the series. The character, played by Paul Kaye, is in three of the six episodes and he's quite destructive, even worse than Karen. Donna is still trying to get a better life, a better boyfriend and a better career but nothing's really working out. Things start working for Karl (Donna's ex). He's really pulled himself together, is moving his life on and trying to get away from Donna. That really freaks Donna out because it flags up how badly things are going for her, as well as the fear of losing Karl, who's always been her back-up plan."

Is your character the one you have the most in common with?
"Yeah, probably. Donna is the character whose antics and storylines are based on stuff that's happened to me in my life. All the characters are, to some extent, based on either me or [co-writer] Dennis Kell and all of the people we've known over the years. I would say Donna is the one that I resemble the most."

You must have been delighted when the BBC showed the first series on BBC Two?
"Yeah, we were very pleased. It took a while, well over a year, to get it out there but we were very pleased that more people got to see it."

Has there been any pressure to tone the show down?
"We didn't have to tone it down at all. In fact, we probably should have. We would have made it a lot easier for ourselves if we did. If the second series doesn't go onto BBC Two we'll be having a moan but we'll only have ourselves to blame. We weren't deliberately trying to make it darker or more obscene, it's just the way we like to write."

Would you do a third series if the BBC asked you to?
"We'd love to. We don't know if it would go any further than three, that might be the maximum. We've definitely got other things we want to say, and we've got ideas for the characters as well, so it would be nice to have a chance to write those things."

A lot of UK shows get picked up by US networks. Would you let Pulling be remade in America?
"Yes, of course. We were in talks with ABC just before the writers' strike and it was all going ahead. [The strike] scuppered things a little because we had a writer and producer lined up and obviously that threw a spanner in the works. We have to wait for things to get back on course again. If you find the right people to adapt it then I think it's fine. The people we were talking to seemed to like the show and had a really good idea of how the American version would work. As long as you stay connected to it and remain a consultant on the show then it's quite possible they could do a really good job. If it works out [we'll] be laughing!"

Do you have any plans to go and write movies?
"Once you write a TV show that's done well, you get approached by a whole bunch of people who make films. I've been asked to write scripts for films but I haven't really got it together yet. It involves a lot of planning so I would have to knuckle down and have a good old think about that. I think most writers have a film script in their head. There's one rattling around there somewhere."

Series two of Pulling starts Sunday at 9.30pm on BBC Three. Series one is available on DVD from April 7.

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