Digital Spy

Search Digital Spy
0

Reality TV Interview

Harry Judd interview: 'Every dance makes my stomach drop!'

By
Strictly Come Dancing 2011: Harry Judd

© BBC

With the opportunity to dance at the upcoming Wembley Arena show approaching, Strictly Come Dancing's Harry Judd is focused on securing his place on the dancefloor. Ahead of his Argentine tango this weekend, Digital Spy caught up with the McFly star to talk waltzing, touring and letting loose. Read on to find out what he had to say.

How happy were you with last Saturday's performance?
"It was great. I was just so pleased to get it out of the way. I'm still hanging on!"

Were you happy with your scores?
"Really happy. It was such a hard week last week. I was stressing so much. It was definitely the hardest week I've had. It really challenged me; mentally and physically. It was such a hard dance. I really didn't know if I'd be able to do it. So to get through it and get really good scores... I was really pleased."

Was it a surprise to see Jason Donovan slip down the board?
"That was a shock! I couldn't believe it. I was talking to him and we agreed it was a wake-up call for everyone. No-one is safe. We've just got to keep working hard!"

How was it having Jennifer Grey on the panel?
"It was amazing. It added new nerves. She knows what it's like after doing Dancing with the Stars. There's so much to take on board with the pressure of the performance. All these different elements - dancing it well, the four judges watching you, the studio audience and then the millions watching."

Do you find it easy to forget that there are millions of people watching you?
"When it starts, I don't know, something just happens; you just do it. Your muscle memory kicks in. You try and just perform it as well as you can."

Harry Judd and Aliona Vilani in rehearsals on 'Strictly Come Dancing - It Take Two'

© WENN / BBC

Harry Judd performing 'Grease' on Strictly Come Dancing

© BBC



Does that add to the nerves?
"Thankfully I've never found it nerve-wracking, even doing live TV performances with the band in the past. The nerves are more for the people in the room. You just see a camera. You can't think that through that camera, 11 million people are watching. Thankfully that doesn't affect me too bad."

Did you have a chance to speak to Jennifer?
"I did actually. Westlife had just done their soundcheck, so I said hi to them, and she was having a photograph with them. So we introduced ourselves. She asked how I was feeling, so I said, 'I'm very nervous this week, I've found the dance really hard'. She pulled me to one side and gave me advice. She's very sweet."

Was it nice to have a break from Len's criticism?
"Yeah, but his criticism is always fair. He criticises everyone in an almost positive way. I take it on board. I know that the only way to keep judges on your side is by performing and doing the dance well. There's no two ways about it. They like us as people I guess, but just because they like you, doesn't mean they'll give you a good score. It's all about doing a good dance. One positive thing is that when criticising me, they say that they are criticising me because they think I'm good and have potential. That's great."

Jennifer asked you to let loose more - how are you going to work on that?
"Yeah, and Alesha agreed. They want me to take it up a notch. I suppose it's about the mental aspect before - being more positive. If anything, just looking forward to the dance and not dreading it. I did feel that I had let go, but obviously I could have done more right from the word go. I've got to work on believing in myself."

You've got the Argentine tango this week - how did you feel when you heard that?
"Every dance makes my stomach drop! I just don't know what any of them are. I'm starting to get a rough idea now. But I'm looking forward to it now; it's another challenge! The hardest two have been the samba and waltz as I found them the hardest to learn. Usually by Wednesday and Thursday, we're just polishing the routine, but with those, I wasn't getting those until the Thursday night."

So yourself and Aliona can just work on it until you're happy?
"Yes, you're allowed as many hours as you like. We do some long hours. Aliona [Vilani] is incredible. She's feeling good about this week. She assured me it wasn't as hard as the samba. We're a great team, great partnership. We work hard and we're enjoying ourselves."

How did you feel about last weekend's result?
"Someone has to go! It's at the point now - Audley had been in the bottom two twice, so last week it wouldn't have been a shock if he had gone. But from now on, anyone that goes is going to be a shock. Everyone has got some great dances, great personality. This is when it gets really tough and really nerve-wracking!"

Is the final in sight for you now?
"Not quite yet. I'm still taking it week by week. Wembley is a target, but to be honest, this week is a target. To get through and do my best this week; to know I've done the best is all I can do."

What was your motivation for doing the show?
"The main thing really was that something inside me knew I could do it. I knew that I was capable of doing it. Not capable of dancing; I didn't really know about that. I just felt that if I was to turn it down, I'd see it as a really negative thing. I'd know I was turning it down because I was too scared. I knew it'd be a real challenge - and those are the most rewarding things. It's definitely been the hardest thing I've ever done."

Is it nice to be viewed as Harry Judd and not Harry 'McFly'?
"Yeah, I suppose so. To be completely honest, I never did this to boost my own profile. I genuinely didn't. I'm 100% happy in McFly - everything is great. I'm representing McFly. It's good if people can feel like they get to know me, that is nice. But I'm not looking to go solo after!"

Tom Fletcher, Danny Jones, Dougie Poynter and Harry Judd from McFly

© Rex Features / Piers Allardyce



Speaking of McFly, do you feel that you're missing out a little now that the others are working on the new album?
"A little bit, yeah. The guys have been away on a writing trip and making some demos. So many things have happened in our career, so many weird things. Albums have been done so differently - from the way they've been recorded and written. To be honest, I do the least writing, so rather me than anyone else! It's a shame, but you've just got to get on with it."

You must be excited about getting back out on the road with McFly next year?
"I'm really looking forward to it! I haven't played drums for pushing eight weeks now. The other day I was watching TV and just thought, 'I really want to play the drums'. Dancing must come first - which I never thought I'd say. I'll be getting back in the studio rehearsing. Touring becomes a challenge, because each tour you want to keep it fresh. A positive thing is that we've had lots of hits in the past and so you want to play those for the people coming. But then there are the hardcore fans who want to hear different album tracks... the more hits you have, the more of the setlist it takes up! It's hard to play everything. We'd be there for a good few hours!"

Westlife have called it a day - will McFly be calling it a day or aiming to reach a milestone?
"No way, certainly not! Westlife got 14 years - we've done eight. I think we could beat 14. We could easily do that! McFly is always our priority regardless of what we've going on elsewhere."

How would you feel about dancing to a McFly track?
"Well, when Danny did Popstar to Operastar, our managers were getting excited about him singing an opera song on tour, but I don't know! It could be a little bit too cheesy. You couldn't even do the dance tongue-and-cheek as I have such respect for dancers and the show. I wouldn't want to do anything taking the mick. At the same time, if I did something seriously, it wouldn't really work. This is so foreign to me. It's so different to me. When you're in a pop/rock band doing live performances - it's completely different to wearing sequins and doing these moves and stuff. The two don't mix unfortunately."

How does 'Strictly Harry' differ to 'McFly Harry'?
"I think... that's a really good question. Strictly Harry is on his own. It's frightening because you've not got your three mates with you. Sometimes as McFly Harry I can hide away from things. This is certainly more of a challenge. I'm just trying to be myself really. The times on Strictly Come Dancing when you're just on camera, even that's nerve-wracking - just talking to Tess or Bruce! It has helped my confidence. People just expect that because you're in a band, you're going to be really confident. Aliona said that she expected me to be like a 25-year-old guy; didn't really care, a bit cocky... but that's not me at all. I completely love throwing myself into whatever I've committed to doing. I'm just trying to be myself all the time!"

Tickets for McFly's 2012 'Up Close & Personal' tour are on sale now via livenation.co.uk

> The darling Judd of gays

You May Like

Comments

Loading...