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'Being Human' Season Two - The Verdict

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'Being Human' Season Two - The Verdict
A gory climax rounded off the excellent second season of Being Human, which never shied away from taking bold dramatic decisions and propelling the lead characters in unexpected directions. A winning mix of humour, poignancy, bloodbaths and Real Hustle references ensured that the BBC Three show has been on top of many 'Must Watch' lists for the last eight weeks. Isn't it time a mysterious door opened up and dragged the programme into the terrestrial world?

One specific sequence sums up just how effectively writer Toby Whithouse has merged horror and comedy together. This took place in a toilet at the language school George was teaching at, where he stepped in to grammatically correct a spot of fellatio-related graffiti on the mirror. When his boss walked in and reeled off some of his hilariously patronising 'teacher speak', George's werewolf instincts took over and a vicious attack was unleashed upon the poor man, leaving him in a bloody mess.

This was jaw-dropping stuff and bore far more impact than Mitchell's somewhat meandering reversion to the dark side. George's character transition from a reliable and sympathetic figure did initially feel misplaced, particularly when he cheated on Nina with Daisy. Yet it was all part of a clever masterplan to take everyone - especially viewers - out of their comfort zones. Russell Tovey was as compelling as ever in the role, superbly conveying the distress of George's transformations (especially at the parents evening) and exuding vulnerability during scenes such as his grilling by the suspicious child Molly.

Another bog-based encounter earlier in the season provided much mirth, involving Mitchell's first meeting with Lucy. The witty, engaging dialogue effortlessly introduced a recurring character into the fold and allowed us to emotionally invest in their relationship. This made the latter revelation about Lucy's true nature, and her eventual demise, even more shocking. Still, nothing quite topped the appearance of Terry Wogan adopting a manipulative guise to offer Saul some relationship advice via his television. Very Ashes To Ashes and undoubtedly genius!

While Mitchell and George went off the rails and fled the flat, Annie was given a procession of quirky male foils to complement her own manic nature. Plenty of laughs ensued during her adventures, before giving way to the very sadness of 'being human'. The finest example came with the inherent loneliness of psychic Alan Cortez, whose dwindling career and confidence was given a boost by Annie's antics. (On a side note, give Cortez his own spinoff show please BBC!). Before long, Annie's own mother turned up seeking closure leading to an emotional reunion between the grieving mother, the ghost and a folded paper napkin. The heartbreak of Annie's removal from pub landlord Hugh was just as poignant too.

The binding story arc across the episodes involved the machinations of the dastardly Kemp and his quest to rid the world of supernatural beings. Played with commanding austerity by Donald Sumpter, the character evolved from being a mere 'boo and hiss' style villain into a figure with genuine (if hugely misguided) religious conviction. After all, in other shows the vampire slayers are the heroes of the piece.

All credit to the team behind Being Human for not merely trying to rehash the same elements that made the first season such a success. The countdown is already underway for the third year, which cannot come soon enough. Just how are the gang going to prise Annie back from the afterlife waiting room area?

> What do you think of the season? Share your views

> Click here for our look at 'Being Human' being funny

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